Upstairs at my house currently sits two $2 dollar bills, probably waiting for something like this story to come out. Just how rare are two dollar bills? Not rare at all actually, but if you have one of the oddly collected denominations, it could be worth thousands.

How rare is a $2 bill?

100 million were printed last year according to the BEP. Just over two billion $100 dollar bills were printed just for comparison.

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What's The Deal With $2 Bills? Why Is Massachusetts Looking For Them?

Massachusetts residents like me may have seen this story "circulating", no pun intended, are checking their drawers or safes for $2 bills with odd serial numbers, particularly old bills in good condition. Some could be worth $20,000.

Americans don't spend two dollar bills because they think they are rare. To be fair, they are the denomination that is printed the least, however, not enough so that their value would be massively more than two dollars.

Serial Numbers, Year Printed, and Condition all Matter

The new bills, forget it. In fact, they're not worth holding on to due to the fact that they will print even more in the future.

Certain $2 bills can fetch $4,500 and up on the collectibles market, according to the U.S. Currency Auctions (USCA) website. Just about all of the really valuable ones were printed in the 19th century. But even bills printed within the last 30 years might be worth hundreds of dollars — if you have the right one.

The $2 bill was first printed in 1862 and is still in circulation today. It originally featured a portrait of Alexander Hamilton, but that changed with an 1869 redesign that put Thomas Jefferson on the bill. The most recent edition of the $2 bill was designed in 1963, according to WFLA, which cited information from the U.S. Treasury Department. -yahoo finance.

You might not have a match, but I'm going home to check to see if I do.

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