Back in July, I mentioned how I noticed a surge in water pressure at my home in Pittsfield. It was absolutely heavenly. Being able to take a shower with blasting water pressure is the perfect shower scenario for me. Don't get me wrong, Pittsfield's normal water pressure is good but when I get that extra power behind the water pressure, it's a whole new showering experience.

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I also mentioned in the July post that the extra pressure didn't last that long and sadly I had to return to the reality of normal water pressure when showering. Now, there is some good news.

The Extra Pressure is Back in Pittsfield (at least in my home) 

This past Sunday (Aug. 28) my family and I went to the Cummington Fair. A few hours after we returned from the fair I jumped into the shower and noticed the big blast of pressure was back. Needless to say, I was thrilled. As of this writing, the extra pressure is still here and I'm going to take advantage of it for as long as I can. Maybe I'll take multiple showers per day...lol. In all honesty, I'm just glad that the extra pressure has returned.

Have You Noticed The Pressure as Well

I'm not sure if this burst in water pressure is all throughout the City of Pittsfield or just in my neck of the woods (I live by outer East Street). If you are experiencing extra pressure, are you enjoying it as well? I hope it's here to stay. My showers just became extra refreshing.

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Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

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