Governor Baker sent out a warning early Friday afternoon telling the people of the Commonwealth to prepare for Hurricane Henri. If you have been following the track of the storm and watching the weather forecasters with the National Weather Service, you know that 'Henri' is not to be underestimated. In fact, Governor Baker is advising against unnecessary travel as the potential exists for strong winds, heavy rain, flooding, and power outages. Baker has also activated the Massachusetts National Guard in preparation. Up to 1,000 guardsmen will remain in place until support is no longer needed, according to today's media release.

Meanwhile, officials in the City of Pittsfield are also raising the red flag for local residents as the city prepares for rainfall ranging between 3-6 inches and 30-40 miles per hour winds Sunday through Monday morning.

Potential impacts from this storm may include flash flooding, downed trees, and power lines... We just want everyone to stay safe so we’re asking the public to prepare ahead, get what you need and stay off the roads as much as possible. ~ Pittsfield Fire Chief Thomas Sammons

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In high wind/rain situations in the Berkshires, we are all too familiar with downed tree limbs, downed wires, and basement flooding (my favorite).

There are some phone numbers you can call to obtain disaster information or to report issues such as downed power lines.

To report a down wire, you should call Eversource at 877-659-8636, assuming you are in the utility's service area.

If you would like to get some general disaster information and tips, you can call 2-1-1.

According to the Governor's office, this storm could cause power outages impacting at least 100,000 residents, and possibly as many as 300,000. For power outage updates and specific restoration times by town, check the Eversource outage map at outagemap.eversource.com or call Eversource at 800-592-2000.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

READ ON: See the States Where People Live the Longest

Stacker used data from the 2020 County Health Rankings to rank every state's average life expectancy from lowest to highest. The 2020 County Health Rankings values were calculated using mortality counts from the 2016-2018 National Center for Health Statistics. The U.S. Census 2019 American Community Survey and America's Health Rankings Senior Report 2019 data were also used to provide demographics on the senior population of each state and the state's rank on senior health care, respectively.

Read on to learn the average life expectancy in each state.